Tag Archives: iran

Rouhani Cabinet Has More US PhD’s Than Obama’s!

Yesterday’s post, Empowering the Moderates in Iran, attracted a comment from SocialInform, which mentioned another blog’s post, Iran’s president has more cabinet members with Ph.D. degrees from U.S. universities than Barack Obama does. Be sure to check out the picture, showing who they are and where they studied. The post mentioned a December 2013 article in The Atlantic which gave more details and is summarized below my signature line. Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Empowering the Moderates in Iran

Today’s New York Times had a long OpEd by David Brooks that argued it is naive to negotiate with Iran. Brooks warns that, “It could be that Iranian leaders are as apocalyptically motivated, paranoid and dogmatically anti-American as their pronouncements suggest they are.” There certainly are “apocalyptically motivated, paranoid and dogmatically anti-American” individuals within the Iranian power structure. But no nation is a monolith, and Iran is no exception. Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Foreign Policy Lessons Applied to Iran

Harvard Professor of International Relations Stephen M. Walt has an excellent article at Foreign Policy, entitled “The Top 5 Foreign Policy Lessons of the Past 20 Years.” I’ve included some short excerpts after my signature line, and encourage you to read … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Significant Progress on Reducing Iran’s Uranium Stockpile

With all the bad news coming out of the Ukraine, it’s nice to report significant progress on rolling back Iran’s nuclear program. For the first time in a year, that nation’s stockpile of 20% enriched uranium has shrunk to the point that it can no longer be further enriched to make a weapon. While cautious optimism is in order, that is really good news. Here are some key excerpts from a February 26 article covering this development (emphasis added): Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Avoiding Needless Wars, Part 10: Iran

The interim agreement to freeze Iran’s nuclear program has been praised by some as a diplomatic breakthrough and condemned by others as a prelude to nuclear disaster. A full appraisal must wait until we see what the follow-on agreements, if any, look like. In the meantime, here’s my take: Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

French Arms Sales and Iran

Dr. Yousaf Butt has an extremely insightful post on Reuters, which points out that “France’s torpedoing of the agreement [to relax sanctions in return for concessions by Iran] appears less related to genuine nuclear proliferation concerns than with trying to curry favor with anti-Iranian countries — like Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates – who commission and buy expensive French military, satellite and nuclear hardware.” The post goes on to note: Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Avoiding Needless Wars, Part 3: Are We About to Repeat the Mistakes of Vietnam?

In August of 1964 Congress passed the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, giving President Johnson a blank check to escalate the war in Vietnam. Two alleged acts of North Vietnamese unprovoked aggression were the basis for that resolution. But, as detailed in Part 1 of this series, their first attack was in response to covert American attacks on North Vietnam, and as detailed in Part 2 the second attack never occurred. This third installment in the series draws on additional formerly classified information to extend those arguments, and concludes by warning of might become a kind of “Iran War Gulf of Tonkin Resolution.” Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments