The Stanford Project

For the reasons explained in email #27, I am focusing on trying to create a “pocket of nuclear sanity” at Stanford that can then serve as a model for the nation as a whole.

If you are at Stanford and might be interested in participating, please send me an email at NuclearRisk@stanford.edu and I will add you to that mailing list. Emails to that list may be more frequent than the limit of one per week imposed here, but I’ll keep it to a reasonable level.

Whether or not you’re at Stanford, if you’d like to hear how the kick off meeting went last Wednesday, a one page summary is available.

I’m currently holding a seminar at Stanford on “Nuclear Weapons, Risk and Hope” and the handouts are available to all. See the NEW RESOURCES section below for a link and some details.

Thank you for your efforts to defuse the nuclear threat.

Martin
================================
Martin Hellman
Member, National Academy of Engineering
Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering
Stanford University

HOW YOU CAN HELP:
If you agree that we should not stand idly by in tacit acceptance of this unacceptable situation, please send a link to this post to friends who might be interested and encourage them to sign up for this blog’s RSS feed. Also, as suggested in email #27, consider whether there you are a member of a group where you might replicate the process I am trying at Stanford. For details, see the project description.

NEW RESOURCES:
The handouts for my Stanford seminar on “Nuclear Weapons, Risk and Hope” are available online and contain information of interest to this audience in general. In particular, pages 4-5 of handout #1 have additions to “Soaring, Cryptography and Nuclear Weapons” (our most popular resource) that illuminate the link between nuclear war, nuclear terrorism and nuclear proliferation. Watch the above page for new handouts every week or so.

REPRODUCING THIS PAGE:
Permission is granted to reproduce this page in whole or in part. A reference to http://nuclearrisk.org/email29.php would be appreciated, or in print to NuclearRisk.org.

About Martin Hellman

I am a professor at Stanford University, best known for my invention of public key cryptography -- the technology that protects the secure part of the Internet, such as electronic banking. But, for almost 30 years, my primary interest has been how fallible human beings can survive possessing nuclear weapons, where even one mistake could be catastrophic. My latest project is a book with the audacious subtitle "Creating True Love at Home & Peace on the Planet." Its soon to open website explains: https://anewmap.com.
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