Tag Archives: putin

Ukraine and Nuclear Risk

The Ukrainian crisis and Putin’s annexation of Crimea badly soured Russian-American relations. But an even more dangerous situation would result should Putin move Russian troops into additional portions of the eastern Ukraine. Certain events that are almost unknown in America increase the chance that will happen. In its own small way, this post hopes to combat that lack of information and thereby reduce the risk that the Ukrainian crisis will escalate further – potentially even to nuclear threats. Continue reading

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Preventing Ukraine From Spiraling Out of Control

The crisis in Ukraine continues to simmer, but thankfully has not yet boiled over. Here are some of the developments since I last wrote on this topic, followed by some thoughts on what is needed to minimize the risk of the conflict spiraling out of control. Continue reading

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Is the Ukrainian Crisis Spiraling Out of Control?

Today’s news indicates a heightened nuclear risk due to a dangerous feedback process at work in the Ukraine. The New York Times’ page 1 ominous headline was, “Striking Town, Ukraine Forces Defy Warning,” and the Wall Street Journal echoed that warning, “Ukraine Sends Troops East As Pro-Russia Forces Strike.” Is the Ukrainian crisis spiraling out of control, and if so, what might we do to reverse that dangerous process? Continue reading

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Henry Kissinger’s Perspective on the Ukrainian Crisis

Former Secretary of State and National Security Adviser Henry Kissinger had an OpEd last week in the Washington Post which just came to my attention, and which presents yet another, interesting perspective on the Ukrainian crisis. I’ve excerpted some key parts. Continue reading

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Ukraine: Why We Need to Stop and Think

Pictures of Ukrainians – some dead, some alive – with blood all over them tugs at our heart strings. And well it should. But, before we let our emotions get the better of us, we need to stop and think: What do we really know? Unless we do that, we risk spilling far more blood. Continue reading

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Unusual Perspectives on the Ukrainian Crisis

We constantly hear the mainstream American reaction to the Ukrainian crisis, with a number of authors even comparing Putin’s actions in the Crimea to Hitler’s takeover of Czechoslovakia’s Sudetenland. My goal, both in today’s post and Sunday’s is to provide alternative perspectives so that you can then draw your own conclusions. Continue reading

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Ukraine: The Value of Risk Analysis in Foreseeing Crises

The quantitative risk analysis approach to nuclear deterrence not only allows a more objective estimate of how much risk we face, but also highlights otherwise unforeseen ways to reduce that risk. The current crisis in Ukraine provides a good example. Continue reading

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Censorship in Russia?

The American mainstream media tends to give the impression that Russia under Putin is not that different from the good ole USSR. Having visited the Soviet Union a number of times prior to Gorbachev’s reforms and keeping abreast of the Russian press today, I know how false that picture is. Before censorship was lifted, the only honest political discussions I could have with my Russian friends was when no other Russians were present, and we were out of range of any possible, hidden microphones (e.g., in my hotel room). Compare that to an article in yesterday’s Moscow Times, which reads in part: Continue reading

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Rigged Russian Election?

Given how our media have covered Russia’s March 4 presidential election, it is understandable that many Americans believe Vladimir Putin stole the presidency. The reality, however, is somewhat different. From all the reading I have done, it appears that there was some electoral fraud, but that Putin would have won by a significant margin in any event. Aside from being wrong, that disconnect between American perception and Russian reality creates a warrantless risk of a nuclear confrontation. Continue reading

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The Risk of Humiliating Adversaries

While many factors propelled the rise of Hitler and Nazism, humiliating Germany at the end of World War I played a major role. Hitler even forced the French to surrender in the same railway car –  in the exact same … Continue reading

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